Duke Energy overlooks clean energy opportunities in latest plan

N.C. groups file to protect customer interests

Investments in solar and energy efficiency would save Duke Energy customers money but are overlooked in the utility’s latest long-term plan. (© Alice Keeney)

A coalition of clean energy advocates filed expert analyses with North Carolina utility regulators today, finding that the Duke Energy’s long-range plans would cost customers too much money by:

  • keeping aging, inefficient coal plants online,
  • building new power plants that are not needed to meet electricity demand, and
  • by failing to tap the full potential of abundant, low-cost, clean energy resources like solar and energy efficiency.

On behalf of Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, and the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, SELC filed the expert reports with the North Carolina Utilities Commission on the Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress “integrated resource plans,” which show how the utilities' plan to meet customer demand for electricity over the next 15 years.

The groups asked the commission to hold a trial-type hearing on the plans, as allowed under state law, so customers can have a thorough vetting of the multi-billion-dollar investments included in the plans, most of which will show up on customers’ monthly bills.

“We’re asking the North Carolina Utilities Commission to take a hard look at Duke Energy’s long-range plans,” said Senior Attorney Gudrun Thompson. “Reviews by industry experts show that Duke’s internal analysis favors polluting, costly coal and gas plants while giving short shrift to cleaner, cheaper options like energy efficiency, solar and wind.”

More News

Cut Virginia Carbon

Virginians, we have the power to ensure clean air, protect health, and build a healthy economy in our state.  Help us act on climate change by c...

Comments filed in massive Chattahoochee forest project

For decades, the public has had a meaningful voice in site-specific decisions made on national forests such as where to log, construct or reroute...

SELC op-ed: Holleman highlights communities’ role in coal ash settlement

An article penned by Senior Attorney Frank Holleman recently appeared on WRAL. In it, Holleman details the bravery and strength required by the c...

White House works to cut public voices from big projects

Today, the Trump administration revealed a disastrous wish list of cuts to the nation’s bedrock environmental law—the National Environmental Poli...

Court delivers win for Union Hill citizens over Atlantic Coast Pipeline

Today the Fourth Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals handed down a victory in SELC’s case against the Virginia Air Pollution Control Board and t...

Bill to protect Virginia wilderness passes Senate

We’re celebrating the U.S. Senate’s passage of the Virginia Wilderness Additions Act earlier this week, which will add a total of 5,600 acres to...

More Stories