Explore the stories of people in the path of the pipeline

For the Harris family, it was when Dominion Energy told them they would be bulldozing just behind their kids’ swing set, despite the parents’ objections. For Hazel Palmer, it was when she realized Dominion Energy could sue her for not letting them survey her property, but she couldn’t sue them for taking land she wasn’t interested in giving up. For former utility executive Tom Hadwin, it was when he looked closer at the utilities' math. For different reasons, and from different perspectives, each of these people came to the same conclusion: We don’t need—or want—the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

InThePath.org, launched today, collects the story of the Harris family and others along the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline path to understand the impacts of what Dominion Energy is proposing with its $6 billion, 600-mile natural gas pipeline running from West Virginia to North Carolina across Virginia.

By inflating demand and creating both supplier and customer for this pipeline, Dominion Energy and its partners are locking us—and future generations—into an expensive, dirty fuel. And they’re expecting Dominion customers to pick up the $6 billion bill for the project, whether or not they ever use the gas the pipeline carries.

The unproven need makes this land grab, threatening families and businesses, historic sites, precious terrain, and the peace of mind of many all the more troublesome.

But this pipeline is not yet built and the stories told on InThePath.org are still unfolding. What happens next will be a sign of how serious state and federal officials are about ensuring our public interests over corporate profit.

More News

Florence in photos

These photos are just a sliver of the many ways Hurricane Florence clobbered our region as she lumbered through after making landfall on Friday,...

SELC challenges new, rushed permits for Atlantic Coast Pipeline

A project of the magnitude of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline can’t move forward with slapdash permits, recycled from project to project. So SELC was...

Coal ash infrastructure fails in wake of Florence’s destruction

As Hurricane Florence continues to churn across the Southeast with many communities still in danger or waiting to fully assess damage, SELC is cl...

Community voices their opposition as Virginia officials consider pipeline infrastructure

Last night members of the Virginia Air Board and staff from the Department of Environmental Quality heard person after person voice their opposit...

Clean energy advocates reach agreement with Duke Energy Carolinas to extend solar program

In a significant move that will bring more solar to South Carolina, clean energy advocates have reached an agreement with Duke Energy Carolinas t...

Virginia community rallies against pipeline’s compressor station

Many residents of Union Hill, a tiny community in Buckingham County founded by formerly enslaved people following the end of the Civil War, are f...

More Stories