Net metering settlement gives SC solar customers full credit for power generated

Residential and commercial utility customers that install solar panels on their rooftops before 2021 when the settlement agreement expires will receive full retail credit for any excess power that flows back onto the electric grid. (© iStock)

Today the South Carolina Public Service Commission approved a settlement agreement reached by utilities and conservation groups, confirming that solar customers in the Palmetto State will receive full credit on their utility bills for the solar power they deliver to the grid. 

“We applaud the Public Service Commission’s approval of this historic agreement that allows South Carolinians to tap our state’s vast solar potential,” said Blan Holman, Managing Attorney for SELC's Charleston office. “We are about to see a wave of affordable, locally-produced solar power that will make South Carolina cleaner and more competitive while generating thousands of local jobs.”  

“Fairly compensating solar customers for the power they generate is another step toward South Carolina’s energy independence,” said John Wilson of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. “Harnessing this carbon-free energy source will provide additional grid security while reducing the need for expensive, outdated power plants and transmission infrastructure.”

“Today’s approval is a major win for solar power in South Carolina.  The decision recognizes the services that solar customers are providing to the entire state,” said Hamilton Davis of the Coastal Conservation League.  “We can expect to see even more public support for residential and commercial solar and the cost-savings those investments will provide.”

Read our press release on the announcement of the settlement agreement.

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