SELC helps shape major improvements to Richmond transit

Updates to the Richmond transit network aim to get more people where they want to go faster, without spending additional funds. (© Richmond Transit Network Plan)

UPDATE (2/14/17): Richmond City Council voted unanimously to support the Richmond Transit Network Plan and its simultaneous implementation with the autumn roll out of the Pulse bus rapid transit line.


It has been decades since the last major update to the Richmond transit network, and it shows. There are often lengthy waits for infrequent buses along key routes, and important city locations take a long time to reach or aren’t connected to service at all.

Starting in October that will change. First, Richmond will launch the Pulse, a new Bus Rapid Transit system along Broad and Main Streets, one of the city’s main east/west corridors. The Pulse will offer more frequent service, with pick-ups scheduled every 15 minutes to connect popular destinations across the city and downtown.

Simultaneous to the Pulse roll out, the state, the city, and the regional transit provider are working to implement the Richmond Transit Network Plan. The plan re-envisions the city’s existing bus routes to drastically cut ride times and increase access to more parts of the city without increasing spending. SELC has worked with developers of the plan since its early stages.

SELC is also working to encourage transit-oriented development along the new routes, expanding the benefits of the plan well beyond those riding the bus. Changes such as zoning updates to focus mixed-use development near transit centers will allow retail and residents to take advantage of the easy access to public transportation.

Richmond City Council is scheduled to vote at its meeting Monday, February 13 on a resolution supporting the route updates and the plan to roll them out in conjunction with the launch of the Pulse.

More News

Alabama lawmakers strengthen ALDOT accountability as part of gas tax increase

In an eventful start to the 2019 legislative session, Alabama lawmakers have taken action to address two of the most serious deficiencies in the...

Groups challenge Interior’s failure to disclose public information

Today SELC and Defenders of Wildlife filed suit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Department of Interior officials for failing to pr...

Virginia leaps forward on coal ash

Today, years of work by a host of dedicated citizens, conservation groups, and elected officials came to fruition, as Governor Ralph Northam sign...

“We Know How To Do This.”

On April 1, SELC’s Founder Rick Middleton will retire after 33 years, passing the torch to a new executive director, Jeff Gleason. On the eve of...

It’s “Sunshine Week,” but SELC focus on public records is year-round

It’s Sunshine Week across our SELC region. And while we are enjoying the extra hour of evening sun gained by setting the clocks ahead, that’s not...

Clean Water Act proposal drastically cuts protections against pollution

SELC continues to battle a Trump administration proposal that would radically reduce the nation’s number of streams and wetlands protected by the...

More Stories