SELC op-ed: Virginians want clean water

This week The Roanoke Times published a letter from Senior Attorney Deborah Murray highlighting the key role clean water plays in Virginian life. Below is an excerpt from the full letter, which is available here.

“As July grows hotter, thousands of Virginians take to the Shenandoah, the James, the New, and countless other Virginia waterways. They go there to swim with children and grandchildren, fish for smallmouth bass and trout, to float in tubes and paddle canoes, and to just plain cool off. Millions more drink water year-round that comes from our rivers and streams. From the marshes and estuaries of the coast and the Chesapeake Bay, to the broad rivers of the Piedmont, to the swift mountain streams of western Virginia, it’s clear that Virginians are wild about water.

“With more than 100,000 miles of streams and approximately one million acres of wetlands, our Commonwealth is rich in water resources. Virginians know this and place a premium on clean water for drinking and recreation.

“Water quality in Virginia has improved over the past several decades, with many more rivers and streams fishable and swimmable than once were. Many of these improvements can be traced to the passage of the Clean Water Act in 1972. The Act was put in place with two commonsense principles in mind: that pollution must be controlled at its source to keep our rivers, streams, and lakes clean; and that the burden of controlling pollution must fall on the polluting industries. Dealing with water pollution after it becomes a problem is far less effective, far less efficient, and far less economical than keeping pollutants out of our water in the first place.”

More News

Water quality in Triangle at risk as massive development advances

There are a lot of moving pieces to establishing a 55,000-person development on the outskirts of a town with a current population of 4,000. The T...

Duke Energy confirms groundwater pollution at coal ash sites

Every Duke Energy coal ash site in the Carolinas is polluting groundwater, according to Duke Energy’s own filings. The only sites that are not po...

Coal ash stored near Virginia park linked to health risks

A new report finds that pollution coming from the Chesterfield Power Station may be leading to an increased health risk for some visitors to the...

Georgia Water Coalition releases annual “Dirty Dozen” report

The Georgia Water Coalition released its annual Dirty Dozen report this week, highlighting the politics, policies and issues that threaten the he...

SELC, coastal partners challenge federal permit for Georgia groin

Though the Georgia coast was largely spared from hurricanes in 2018, storm damage to Sea Island from previous years has led developers to expand...

Northam acts to better prepare Virginia for climate change

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam has signed an executive order to strengthen the state’s ability to withstand the impacts of climate change. When sig...

More Stories