Suit voluntarily dismissed after timber sale cancelled by Cherokee National Forest

(© Bill Lea)

Earlier today, SELC, on behalf of the Tennessee Chapter of the Sierra Club, with Knoxville attorney Shelby Ward, on behalf of Heartwood and Tennessee Heartwood, voluntarily dismissed a lawsuit previously filed in federal court alleging that the United States Forest Service has illegally endangered the soil, forests and waters of the Cherokee National Forest and hidden those risks from the public. The suit focused on the so-called Dinkey Project, a timber sale slated for an area along Tumbling Creek with steep slopes and fragile soils that made it a poor choice for commercial operations. For years, concerned citizens had flagged this sale as problematic to no avail. Last week, in response to the lawsuit, the Forest Service cancelled the sale.

We take the Forest Service’s decision to withdraw the timber sale near Tumbling Creek as an important first step in rebuilding the trust that has been eroded between local citizens and the Forest Service,” said Sam Evans, leader of SELC’s National Forest and Parks Program. “Our decision to dismiss the lawsuit is intended in the same spirit.”

The health of Tumbling Creek was a major factor in the lawsuit. A cold-water trout stream running through the mountains of southeast Tennessee, it feeds into the Ocoee River and is popular with local families for fishing, wading, and picnicking. Conservation groups were worried that, as with other recent timber sales in the area, heavy commercial logging along the creek would lead to erosion, harming fish and other wildlife.

In 2015, monitoring of a recent logging project, known as the Hogback sale, revealed severe violations of the Forest Service’s requirement to protect soils, but this information was not acknowledged in the development of the Tumbling Creek project.

There was no indication that the Forest Service learned anything from Hogback, and the Tumbling Creek project was even risker, with more ground disturbances, larger harvests and steeper slopes, all concentrated on the banks of Tumbling Creek,” said Axel Ringe, Conservation Chair for the Tennessee Chapter of the Sierra Club. “This is one of the healthiest watersheds and streams in the area. We couldn’t allow another disastrous timber sale to happen here.”

For nearly four years, conservation groups tried to dissuade the Forest Service from taking unnecessary risks on publicly-owned lands, using pictures, examples and monitoring data to show what could go wrong. The Forest Service did not respond to those concerns and so, in July 2017, these groups filed a formal administrative objection. That objection fell on deaf ears, and was dismissed without review. Local citizens felt they had no choice but to file suit.

It’s extremely unfortunate that the Cherokee National Forest refused to take public comments seriously until a lawsuit was filed,” said Davis Mounger, co-founder of Tennessee Heartwood. “Cancelling the project is not exactly what we asked for, but it is a welcome development. It shows that the Forest Service is finally listening. However, that withdrawal of the project, by itself, isn’t enough. The only way to fix the problem going forward is for the Forest Service to learn from its mistakes. That means accepting responsibility and working transparently with the public. Ultimately, the Forest Service needs to adopt new protective measures that we can all be confident will protect soil and water conditions. We look forward to being a part of that process.”

More News

Public comments lead to modifications in agreement stopping Chemours’ GenX pollution

Today North Carolina officials filed an updated agreement that requires the Chemours Company, LLC to stop polluting the Cape Fear River with toxi...

Motion filed to halt seismic blasting

A group of conservation organizations including SELC today asked a federal judge to block the start of harmful seismic airgun blasting in the Atl...

Camden County, Ga. sued over documents withheld about Spaceport risks

As proponents of Spaceport Camden continue to push the controversial project forward despite mounting questions concerning public safety and envi...

Duke University is last piece in regional light rail puzzle

Duke University is the lone holdout at a critical juncture for the long-planned and widely supported Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit Project. Go...

Coal ash cleanup victory in Virginia

Today, Virginia legislators from both sides of the aisle came together amid a remarkably tumultuous political backdrop, to pass a law that will o...

Take action to protect clean water

A few weeks ago the Environmental Protection Agency announced an unprecedented, risky proposal to gut clean water protections that have been in p...

More Stories