Suit voluntarily dismissed after timber sale cancelled by Cherokee National Forest

(© Bill Lea)

Earlier today, SELC, on behalf of the Tennessee Chapter of the Sierra Club, with Knoxville attorney Shelby Ward, on behalf of Heartwood and Tennessee Heartwood, voluntarily dismissed a lawsuit previously filed in federal court alleging that the United States Forest Service has illegally endangered the soil, forests and waters of the Cherokee National Forest and hidden those risks from the public. The suit focused on the so-called Dinkey Project, a timber sale slated for an area along Tumbling Creek with steep slopes and fragile soils that made it a poor choice for commercial operations. For years, concerned citizens had flagged this sale as problematic to no avail. Last week, in response to the lawsuit, the Forest Service cancelled the sale.

We take the Forest Service’s decision to withdraw the timber sale near Tumbling Creek as an important first step in rebuilding the trust that has been eroded between local citizens and the Forest Service,” said Sam Evans, leader of SELC’s National Forest and Parks Program. “Our decision to dismiss the lawsuit is intended in the same spirit.”

The health of Tumbling Creek was a major factor in the lawsuit. A cold-water trout stream running through the mountains of southeast Tennessee, it feeds into the Ocoee River and is popular with local families for fishing, wading, and picnicking. Conservation groups were worried that, as with other recent timber sales in the area, heavy commercial logging along the creek would lead to erosion, harming fish and other wildlife.

In 2015, monitoring of a recent logging project, known as the Hogback sale, revealed severe violations of the Forest Service’s requirement to protect soils, but this information was not acknowledged in the development of the Tumbling Creek project.

There was no indication that the Forest Service learned anything from Hogback, and the Tumbling Creek project was even risker, with more ground disturbances, larger harvests and steeper slopes, all concentrated on the banks of Tumbling Creek,” said Axel Ringe, Conservation Chair for the Tennessee Chapter of the Sierra Club. “This is one of the healthiest watersheds and streams in the area. We couldn’t allow another disastrous timber sale to happen here.”

For nearly four years, conservation groups tried to dissuade the Forest Service from taking unnecessary risks on publicly-owned lands, using pictures, examples and monitoring data to show what could go wrong. The Forest Service did not respond to those concerns and so, in July 2017, these groups filed a formal administrative objection. That objection fell on deaf ears, and was dismissed without review. Local citizens felt they had no choice but to file suit.

It’s extremely unfortunate that the Cherokee National Forest refused to take public comments seriously until a lawsuit was filed,” said Davis Mounger, co-founder of Tennessee Heartwood. “Cancelling the project is not exactly what we asked for, but it is a welcome development. It shows that the Forest Service is finally listening. However, that withdrawal of the project, by itself, isn’t enough. The only way to fix the problem going forward is for the Forest Service to learn from its mistakes. That means accepting responsibility and working transparently with the public. Ultimately, the Forest Service needs to adopt new protective measures that we can all be confident will protect soil and water conditions. We look forward to being a part of that process.”

More News

Florence in photos

These photos are just a sliver of the many ways Hurricane Florence clobbered our region as she lumbered through after making landfall on Friday,...

SELC challenges new, rushed permits for Atlantic Coast Pipeline

A project of the magnitude of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline can’t move forward with slapdash permits, recycled from project to project. So SELC was...

Coal ash infrastructure fails in wake of Florence’s destruction

As Hurricane Florence continues to churn across the Southeast with many communities still in danger or waiting to fully assess damage, SELC is cl...

Community voices their opposition as Virginia officials consider pipeline infrastructure

Last night members of the Virginia Air Board and staff from the Department of Environmental Quality heard person after person voice their opposit...

Clean energy advocates reach agreement with Duke Energy Carolinas to extend solar program

In a significant move that will bring more solar to South Carolina, clean energy advocates have reached an agreement with Duke Energy Carolinas t...

Virginia community rallies against pipeline’s compressor station

Many residents of Union Hill, a tiny community in Buckingham County founded by formerly enslaved people following the end of the Civil War, are f...

More Stories