Though delayed, new ozone standard is a step forward in improving public health

Tightening the national standard for ozone pollution is critical for improving air quality and public health, particularly for children, the elderly, and those with heart or lung conditions.  (© Amy Benoit)

The Environmental Protection Agency announced today it has tightened the new ozone pollution standard to 70 parts per billion (ppb), marking belated, incremental progress in the ongoing efforts to reduce air pollution and improve public health.

Ground-level ozone, or smog, is a colorless, odorless gas that can trigger respiratory issues such as asthma attacks and cause other health complications, particularly for those with lung and heart disease. In the South, as is the case for most of the country, car exhaust and emissions from power plants are the largest sources of nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, the primary contributors to ozone pollution.

“Today’s announcement serves as reminder that decisions about how much we drive and where our electricity comes from are also decisions about our health, particularly for the most vulnerable among us.  Across the region, the success we’ve seen in lowering ozone levels over the past few years -- while the economy has kept growing -- can continue if we make smart state and local decisions about our energy and transportation investments,” said Frank Rambo, leader of SELC’s Clean Energy and Air Program.

EPA last revised the ozone standard in 2008 to 75 ppb, despite independent scientific advisory board recommendations that health studies showed the need for a limit in the range of 60-70 ppb. The agency failed to follow through on a promise to revisit the standard in 2011. 

More News

Federal court throws out pipeline’s Forest Service approval

Today the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals vacated a federal approval for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline to cross two national forests and part of th...

Looking ahead to major energy decisions in 2019, Georgians demand Fair Energy Now

High power bills burden many Georgia families, but few know why that is or what they can do about it. To change that, SELC, Georgia Interfaith P...

Op-ed: Why we support the Chemours consent order

Senior Attorney Geoff Gisler and Cape Fear Riverkeeper Kemp Burdette laid out their case for settlement over GenX contamination in a piece publis...

SELC sues to stop seismic blasting in the Atlantic

Southern Environmental Law Center attorneys today joined a coalition of conservation groups in filing a lawsuit to stop the Trump administration...

Administration announces plan to gut clean water protections

Today the Environmental Protection Agency released a new proposal that, if approved, would remove clean water protections that have been in place...

Virginia officials reject Dominion IRP and ACP construction halted

Today the Virginia State Corporation Commission issued an order rejecting Dominion Energy’s Integrated Resource Plan, which lays out the utility’...

More Stories