FERC Approves Unnecessary and Destructive Pipelines

Charlottesville, VA - Late Friday the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued its permits for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and Moutain Valley Pipeline projects.

The Southern Environmental Law Center, which had petitioned FERC for an evidentiary heading on the ACP, issued the following statement in response:

"While FERC's anticipated rubber-stamp of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline follows a long trend of this agency's failure to carry out its responsibilities and properly assess projects, Commissioner LaFleur's unexpected dissent shows that even within FERC, this pipeline is seen as harmful and unnecessary.  SELC plans to challenge the majority's decision to brush under the rug compelling evidence that this environmentally destructive pipeline is not needed to meet the energy demands of our region. The utilities involved in the construction of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline claim utility customers will save money, when in fact this pipeline will drive up ratepayers' bills - and cause harm to national forests and to rivers and streams while threatening to commit our states to fossil fuels for decades to come. But today's decision is not the end. It's now up to North Carolina and Virginia state leaders to actually take a look at the real, serious, and unnecessary risks to water quality and other resources, and put the brakes on this wasteful project." SELC Senior Attorney, Greg Buppert.

###

About The Southern Environmental Law Center:

The Southern Environmental Law Center is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. With nine offices across the region (Charlottesville, VA; Chapel Hill, NC; Atlanta, GA; Charleston, SC; Washington, DC; Birmingham, AL; Nashville, TN; Asheville, NC; and Richmond, VA), SELC is widely recognized as the Southeast’s foremost environmental organization and regional leader. SELC works on a full range of environmental issues to protect the South’s natural resources and the health and well-being of all the people in our region. www.SouthernEnvironment.org