Take action: Tell NC officials to demand coal ash clean up

North Carolina holds public meetings on Duke Energy's coal ash pollution

Recent monitoring shows Duke Energy is polluting the groundwater at its NC coal ash sites with toxic and radioactive materials.

Join communities across North Carolina in telling Governor Cooper and the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) that it should require Duke Energy to remove its coal ash from its leaking, unlined pits and move its coal ash to dry lined storage away from our waterways and out of our groundwater. 

DEQ is holding public sessions near six of Duke Energy’s unlined, leaking coal ash sites not currently slated for cleanup, and soliciting public comments online, as the state agency considers what it will require Duke Energy to do with its polluting coal ash at these sites.  

Duke Energy plans to leave its coal ash at these six sites, where it will keep polluting our groundwater, lakes, and rivers, despite the fact that Duke is required to remove coal ash at eight other sites in North Carolina and all of its sites in South Carolina. It is critical to show up at these hearings and submit comments to tell Governor Cooper and DEQ that all families and communities in North Carolina deserve the same protection from coal ash pollution. 

Take action today by submitting a comment to DEQ.

Demand Coal Ash Cleanup

DEQ has invited public comments on this issue, so this is our chance to demand that Duke clean up coal ash at all of its sites in North Carolina. Feel free to edit the comment below: if you live near one of the six sites or have been affected by this risk, it would be helpful to include that.

Comments must be submitted by February 15.
 

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